What Is The Moral Of The Miller’S Tale?

Why is the Miller mad at the Reeve?

“The Reeve’s Tale” is an attempt by the Reeve to “quite,” or answer, “The Miller’s Tale.” The Reeve is angry because the Miller has just told a story in which a carpenter is humiliated by his wife and her lover.

The similarity between the two tales may be evidence of a source relationship between them..

Who is John in The Miller’s Tale?

John is the first character to whom we are introduced in “The Miller’s Tale.” We learn that he is a well-to-do carpenter who lives in Oxford, has married a much younger wife, and rents a room in his house to scholars.

How is the Miller’s tale a satire?

Chaucer set up these characters as the poke fun of lower class society. … The purpose of satire in the Miller’s Tale was for Chaucer to be able to better reveal his perspective on the lower-class society. Chaucer is obviously ridiculing the lower-class people for their earthy and bodily behaviors.

What characteristics of chivalry are present in the tale?

“The Knight’s Tale” features an element of The Code of Chivalry, never attacking and unarmed foe, which drives the plot forward and gives the characters a sense of honor to them, which forces them to make choices different than most others.

What happens to Nicholas in The Miller’s Tale?

When Absolon, angered at being tricked into kissing Alisoun’s butt, returns to the window bent on revenge, Nicholas tries to get in on the joke by sticking his buttocks out the window. Instead, he gets branded by Absolon’s hot poker. In terrible pain, Nicholas cries out for water to douse the heat.

Is The Miller’s Tale a poem?

The Miller’s Tale – Poem by Geoffrey Chaucer. THE PROLOGUE. Let see now who shall tell another tale: For truely this game is well begun.

What is the purpose of the Miller’s tale?

The Miller’s Tale has two main purposes. The first is to say that two people who get married should be alike, in age most especially. The carpenter in the Miller’s tale is an old man who marries a young maid who has yet to experience much of life. The marriage was doomed from the start.

What does the Miller’s tale say about the Miller?

We are told that he is a powerful and strong man, “he was of brawn, and eek of bones” (l. 546). He is described as a man who can break down doors with his head and is a “knotty fellow.” Aside from his brute strength, the Miller is described as a man with a “berd as any sowe or fox was reed” (l. 551).

Who tells the Miller’s tale?

“The Miller’s Tale” (Middle English: The Milleres Tale) is the second of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1380s–1390s), told by the drunken miller Robin to “quite” (a Middle English term meaning requite or pay back, in both good and negative ways) “The Knight’s Tale”.

What happened in the Miller’s tale?

The Miller’s Tale, one of the 24 stories in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. … This bawdy story of lust and revenge is told by a drunken, churlish Miller. Alison, the young wife of a carpenter, takes their boarder Nicholas as her lover.

What is the moral of the Knight’s Tale?

There are two main lessons in the Knights Tale. The first lesson is how the best man does not always succeed in everything he does. In the Knights Tale, Arcite wins in the battle against Palamon for Emily’s hand. In the end, Palamon wins Emily’s hand due to fate.

What kind of story is the Miller’s tale?

“The Miller’s Tale” is also about a love triangle, but it’s far from highbrow. Instead, “The Miller’s Tale” comes from the genre called fabliau. Fabliaux were bawdy stories, usually dealing with adulterous liaisons.

What are the characteristics of a knight?

Knights were known for their masterful skills with horses. A knight’s code of conduct included: mercy, humility, honor, sacrifice, faithfulness, courage, utmost graciousness and courtesy toward women.

What is the theme of the Miller’s tale?

Themes in the Miller’s tale include love and sex, lies and deceit, and competition. John the carpenter is deeply in love with his young wife, Alison. He goes to great lengths in an attempt to save her life from a flood.

Which is the longest tale in Canterbury Tales?

The Tale of MelibeeThe Tale of Melibee is the longest of The Canterbury Tales, and the most dense. It may be that Chaucer, having been cut off midway through “The Tale of Sir Thopas,” gets his revenge by telling the longest, dullest prose tale he can think of.

What happens at the end of the Miller’s tale?

The love triangle between Nicholas, Absolon, and Alisoun reaches its climax, and the Miller’s belief that a great flood is coming seems to be vindicated, causing him to cut the rope that’s attaching him to the ceiling, which brings him crashing to the floor.

What is the setting of the Miller’s tale?

A carpenter’s house in Oxford, England, around 1380 It’s important that this story is set in Oxford because this was (and is) a university town with a large student population.